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Gear

Mon
12
Aug
Alia Parker's picture

How to select the best bicycle lights for touring

Moon X-Power 500 bike headlight. Cycle Traveller

Most cycle touring takes place in the day and as a result, the importance of having adequate bike lights is often overlooked. It's easy to forget that there are many situations in which visibility may be poor, whether it be dark and stormy, rainy, misty, foggy, dawn, dusk and of course, night. In any of these circumstances, you need to make sure you are visible, not just for your own safety, but for the safety of others using the road.

Fri
19
Jul
Alia Parker's picture

Review: ultralight cooking with the Optimus Crux stove

The Optimus Crux, lightweight camp stove. Cycle Traveller

There's a lot to carry on a self-supported bicycle tour, even more so when riding solo. So it's worth investing in ultralight camping gear, both from a weight and space perspective. Here's one lightweight stove that won't break the bike.

Fri
28
Jun
Alia Parker's picture

Buyer's guide: how to choose the right bicycle helmet

How to choose the right bicycle helmet. Cycle Traveller

A good bicycle helmet gives you a degree of protection against brain damage and potential death in the event of an accident while cycling, so even though helmets are compulsory in Australia, it's important not to whack any old thing on your noggin. Fortunately, all helmets sold in Australia must meet Australian Standard 2063, which means the helmets are tested to ensure they “significantly” reduce and distribute force on impact. To make sure your helmet performs this action, it's important to make sure you use the right helmet for your riding style and that it fits properly.

Fri
17
May
Alia Parker's picture

Test ride: review of three very different touring bikes

Surly Long Haul Trucker classic touring bicycle review. Cycle Traveller

You can rig-up just about any bicycle for touring and get by just fine, but when it comes to comfort, stability, usability and utility, it's hard to beat a purpose-built touring bike. A touring bike is built for long days in the saddle, has a strong frame and practical mounting points for carrying a load as well as a wide selection of gears to haul that load up and over any road. But there are many variables when it comes to touring bikes and you'll need to think about the type of touring you plan to do when selecting one. I popped into touring bike specialists Cheeky Transport in Newtown, Sydney, to test ride three very different touring bikes they recommend: the Tout Terrain Silkroad, the Surly Long Haul Trucker and the Surly Ogre.

Thu
02
May
Alia Parker's picture

The art of an ideal bicycle touring pannier set-up

An ideal set-up for mounting bicycle touring panniers. Cycle Traveller

Rack-mounted panniers are the most popular means of carrying gear on a self-supported bicycle tour and if you take a look around at other riders, you'll notice that everyone has their own unique set-up. There's no 'wrong' way to carry your gear, but research shows that there is an 'ideal' way to distribute the weight across your bike.

Thu
11
Apr
Alia Parker's picture

Schwalbe vs Continental: top cycle touring tyres compared

Schwalbe Marathon Plus vs Continental Country Plus. Review by Cycle Traveller

When it comes to bicycle touring tyres, there are without a doubt two names that stand out: Schwalbe and Continental. It's no mistake these two brands have developed a faithful group of followers; their touring tyres are reliable, durable, well crafted, have high puncture resistance as well as the perfect balance between roll and traction. While both manufacturers have a large range of excellent tyres, the two that stand out from a bicycle touring perspective are the Schwalbe Marathon Plus and the Continental Country Plus. Both these tyres are hard wearing and suited to classic on-road touring, including sealed, unsealed and compacted dirt roads.

Thu
28
Mar
Alia Parker's picture

Seven tips to buying the right bicycle touring shoe

Seven tips to buying the right pair of bicycle touring shoes. Cycle Traveller

Our feet work hard on a bicycle tour; they're the major contact point in which we transfer our energy onto the pedals to keep us moving, day after day. Given the amount of pressure we put on our feet, it's important to think about the type of footwear we dress them in. Does the sole provide adequate support to prevent numbness? Should you wear cleats? What type of cleats? And will you need to carry more than one pair of shoes?

Tue
26
Feb
Alia Parker's picture

How to create electricity and charge devices using a bike

Generate bicycle power with The Plug or a Luxos and a dynamo. Cycle Traveller

Generating your own pedal power is becoming an attractive option for those on a long-haul bicycle tour with it becoming increasingly harder for us to travel without our smart phones, iPads, netbooks, e-readers, digital cameras and GPS devices. Many parts of Australia are remote and cycling between towns or truck stops can take days, making it hard to keep all your electronic devices charged and working.

Wed
06
Feb
Alia Parker's picture

What to look for in a good pair of cycling shorts

Assos women's knicks. Finding the right cycling shorts. Cycle Traveller

Let's face it; the human bottom wasn't designed to bump and rub against a small hard bicycle seat all day. For cyclists, the end result is often chaffing and saddle sores. But we're a persistent lot and fortunately technology has a way of making these things more comfortable for our gluteus. Cycle touring involves a lot of saddle time, so investing in some good cycling shorts will make your days much more enjoyable. So what should you look for? First up, you generally have four main options: knicks, bib shorts, mountain bike shorts and skin suits.

Wed
23
Jan
Alia Parker's picture

Why you need duct tape for emergency bike repairs

Duct tape: a bikepacker's best friend. Cycle Traveller

It's true; you can fix almost anything with duct tape and when it comes to being stuck out in the middle of nowhere with a broken bicycle, duct tape could become your new best friend. Bang for your buck, duct tape is just about the best value 'gear' you can take with your while touring. Retailing from between $3 to $6, this pressure-sensitive polyethylene coated tape has a remarkable ability to hold together anything that has come apart.

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