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World's Top 20 bike friendly cities for 2015

Alia Parker's picture
Cycling in Paris, France, one of the world's bike-friendly cities. Cycle Traveller

Amsterdam has been trumped as the world's most cyclable city, with Copenhagen moving into the top spot for the first time, the 2015 Copenhagenize Index of the world's most bike friendly cities shows.

The Danish capital took out the honours after ranking a close second in the past two lists – an index of the Top 20 most bike friendly cities in the world, released every two years by urban design consultancy Copenhagenize Design Co.

“Copenhagen overtook Amsterdam for first place, but it's still those two cities that dominate,” said Mikael Colville-Andersen, CEO of Copenhagenize Design Co. “The rest of the list, however, was totally shaken up.”

No Australian cities have made it into the Top 20 since the first Index was released in 2011. However, two cities from outside Europe earned a ranking in the Index for the first time: Minneapolis and Buenos Aires.

Peak hour is cycling capital Copenhagen. Cycle Traveller“Buenos Aires stomps the competition (bonus points!) and nails the South American continent, at the expense of Rio de Janeiro, who seem to have lost interest and subsequently dropped out of the Top 20,” Colville-Andersen said.

“Europe continues to have a strong presence, though Germany is slacking – Berlin falls, Munich slips off the list entirely and Hamburg is hanging on by a thread.”

Vienna made a return appearance to the list in 2015, ranking 16th after having dropped out of the Top 20 in 2013.

Two Japanese cities, Tokyo and Nagoya, also slipped off the 2015 list, with Tokyo having ranked as high as 4th in 2011. Canada's Montreal, which ranked 8th in 2011, fell to 20th place. But he said competition in North America was heating up, with Minneapolis making its first showing and others in the region closing in.

Colville-Andersen said developing cycling infrastructure is an important step forward for global cities, with studies in Denmark showing that society enjoys a net profit of 23 cents for every kilometre cycled, compared with a 16 cent loss for every kilometre driven by car.

The 2015 Copenhagenize Index focuses on the cyclability of metropolitan cities around the world with populations greater than 600,000 (with a few exceptions for smaller cities that have a key regional or political importance).

Thirteen categories are assessed in determining which cities make the cut: advocacy, bicycle culture, bicycle facilities, infrastructure, bike share programs, gender split, percentage of cyclists compared with other methods of transport, perception and safety, politics, social acceptance, urban planning and traffic calming (such as lower speed limits, etc.)

Top 20 bike friendly cities 2015 [ 2013 / 2011 ranking ]

Cycling with the kids in Amsterdam, Cycle Traveller.

  1. Copenhagen, Denmark [ 2 / 2 ]
  2. Amsterdam, Netherlands [ 1 / 1 ]
  3. Utrecht, Netherlands [ 3 / – ]
  4. Strasbourg, France [ – / – ]
  5. Eindhoven, Netherlands [ 8 / – ]
  6. Malmö, Sweden [ 9 / – ]
  7. Nantes, France [ 7 / – ]
  8. Bordeaux, France [ 5 / – ]
  9. Antwerp, Belgium [ 7 / – ]
  10. Seville, Spain [4 / – ]
  11. Barcelona, Spain [ 17 / 3 ]
  12. Berlin, Germany [ 16 / 5 ]
  13. Ljubljana, Slovenia [ – / – ]
  14. Buenos Aires, Argentina [ – / – ]
  15. Dublin, Ireland [ 10 / 9 ]
  16. Vienna, Austria [ – / 19 ]
  17. Paris, France [ 20 / 7 ]
  18. Minneapolis, United States [ – / – ]
  19. Hamburg, Germany [ 15 / 11 ]
  20. Montreal, Canada [ 13 /  8 ]

Images: 1. Cycling in Paris, France. 2. Cyclists during peak hour in Copenhagen, Denmark. 3. Commuting with the kids, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Source: Copenhagenize Design Co.

Comments

I think sometimes bike useage is confused with bike friendly.

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